LATEST NEWS

Igor Lipinski performs his Faculty Recital at The University of Tennessee School of Music in Knoxville, TN

Listen to excerpts from Dr. Igor Lipinski’s Faculty Recital at Sandra G. Powell Recital Hall at The University of Tennessee School of Music in Knoxville, TN. On his debut performance as a piano faculty at the university, Dr. Lipinski performed music by Chopin, Liszt, Paderewski, Siegler, Janáček, Godowsky, and Grünfeld.

Igor Lipinski’s Doctor of Musical Arts Degree Recital on YouTube

Igor Lipinski plays Liszt’s transcription of Schubert’s song “Gretchen am Spinnrade” during his Doctor of Musical Arts Degree Recital at Galvin Recital Hall, Ryan Center for the Musical Arts at Bienen School of Music, Northwestern University, December 10, 2015.

Invitation to Igor Lipinski’s Doctor of Musical Arts Degree Recital at Northwestern University

Igor Lipinski will be performing his fourth doctoral degree recital at Northwestern University’s Bienen School of Music. The program will include Liszt’s Ballade, Schubert’s Song Transcriptions, Chopin’s Waltz Brilliante, Paderewski’s Variations, Concert Paraphrases on Verdi’s Rigoletto and Strauss’s Die Fledermaus, and more. Lipinski will be playing at the exquisite Galvin Recital Hall—part of the newly opened Ryan Center for Musical Arts—on 70 Arts Circle Drive in Evanston, Illinois. The recital is scheduled for Thursday, December 10 at 6pm. The concert is open to the public with free admission.

Igor Lipinski debuts Paderewski Piano Concerto at Symphony Center in Chicago

Igor Lipinski joins the Paderewski Symphony Orchestra as a soloist in performance of Paderewski’s Piano Concerto in A Minor at the Symphony Center’s Orchestra Hall in Chicago. The gala concert celebrates the 155th anniversary of Ignace Jan Paderewski’s birth, honoring the legacy of one of the greatest pianists from the Golden Age of Piano, composer extraordinaire, philanthropist, political leader, diplomat, and the first Prime Minister of Poland. You can preview the music by listening to Lipinski’s NPR broadcast with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra back in 2008.

Paderewski took part in twenty concert tours in the United States. He performed 1500 concerts, 65 of which took place in Chicago. In 1892, he performed in the inaugural season of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Theodore Thomas, and in 1931 he played his own Piano Concerto in A Minor under the baton of Frederick Stock at Northwestern University. At the November concert in Symphony Center, Lipinski will be presenting the concerto on the same stage where Paderewski himself performed on numerous occasions.

The gala concert will also feature excerpts from Paderewski’s Symphony in B Minor, Elgar’s “Polonia” Overture, Chopin’s Grand Polonaise, and a preview of the orchestra’s upcoming opera production of Moniuszko’s The Haunted Manor at the Lyric Opera.

The concert is Sunday, November 8 at 3pm at the Symphony Center’s Orchestra Hall, 220 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, Illinois, 60604. For tickets, please visit cso.org or pasochicago.org

Igor Lipinski at the Lakes Area Music Festival in Minnesota

On August 2, 2015, Igor Lipinski performed a highly successful orchestral version of his music & magic show entitled “Symphonic Magic” with the Lakes Area Music Festival Orchestra. According to Brainerd Dispatch, Lipinski’s performance of “Symphonic Magic” brought out the largest audience since the festival began. The following interview was published by the Lakes Area Music Festival on July 31, 2015. Photo credit: David Boran.

Tell us about your background. Where are you from? How did you get into music? Where and how did you train?
I was born in Tarnow, a small town in southern Poland, sixty miles east of Krakow. I went to a performing arts high school. In my junior year, I won an audition for the role of a pianist in a theater play production at the University at Buffalo. Before the final dress rehearsal, I traveled to Rochester, New York and visited Eastman School of Music for the first time. I fell in love with the school and applied there the following year. I came to Eastman in 2005 and graduated with my BM and MM in Piano Performance in 2011. In 2012, I moved to Evanston, Illinois where I’m currently finishing a DMA in Piano Performance at Northwestern University. I’m writing my doctoral thesis on the performance practice of the most extraordinary pianists of the past: From Liszt to Victor Borge: A Legacy of Unique Piano Performances.

How did you develop your programs? Where did the idea to combine magic and music come from?
As musicians we sometimes forget about the most important aspect of performing in front of people: making a meaningful, lasting connection with the audience, creating a sense of wonder. Classical music is a bridge that connects with people on a very intimate level. Magic shares the same qualities, but differs in one principal aspect. Music is essentially an auditory experience while magic relies on the visual stimuli. I realized that a clever, visual magic can amplify audience’s appreciation of a complex musical work. In addition, magic brings back the much needed level of interaction between the performer and the audience so familiar to the nineteenth-century concert goer, but often forgotten in the twenty-first century concert hall. As a side effect, the new audio-visual collaboration becomes an engaging and memorable concert experience.

I owe interest in magic to my great-grandfather. He wasn’t a professional magician per se, but I vividly remember him entertaining the kids in our family with a few simple magic tricks. When he passed away, I inherited a book on card magic from his drawer. I was just six years old and that’s when it all started. I was essentially self-taught. There were only a few books written on magic in Polish so I had to learn English in order to learn the new techniques and meet other magicians. I traveled to magic conventions and performed at festivals throughout the Europe, from France to Czech Republic. When I was sixteen, I went to Dubai, United Arab Emirates to give sixty shows at the Dubai Summer Surprises Festival.

My heart, however, has always been with music. During my undergraduate years, along with completing my piano performance degree, I enrolled in an honors program with an ambitious senior project: I was finally going to combine my lifetime interest in magic with a piano recital. I worked with a theater director from the University of Rochester, I researched performance techniques of the nineteenth-century artists, conceived the script and premiered “An Evening of Music & Magic” in 2009. I sent the DVD of the performance to my friend Harold Weller, Conductor Laureate of Las Vegas Philharmonic, who in turn forwarded it to Teller of the Las Vegas magicians duo Penn & Teller. Teller, a one-of-a-kind performer and one of the most inspiring minds in magic, invited me to Vegas where we created a piece of magic based on a fugue by J.S. Bach that won the 2011 WQXR Classical Comedy Contest at Caroline’s on Broadway.

What are some recent projects you are particularly proud of? Any upcoming shows you’re looking forward to?
I’m fortunate to be constantly working on new ideas for the show. I love collaborating with orchestras and have worked on wonderful concerts with an immensely creative conductor Jung-Ho Pak and the Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra. In the upcoming season, I’m making my concerto debut at the Symphony Hall in Chicago and I’m taking my show to New York City and Hong Kong, among other places. I’m also working on an all-consuming book project based on my doctoral research.

Why music? What do you think makes classical music valuable in today’s world?
Two quotes come to mind. Polish pianist Krystian Zimerman once said that music is more than just an organized sound. Music is a flow of emotions organized in time. Musical work is an emotionally-charged story. By listening, learning and disseminating these stories with each other, music empowers us to connect, understand and strive to be better to one another. One of my mentors I have never met, Leonard Bernstein, said that “the best way to know a thing is to learn it in the context of another discipline.” Discovering the vast wealth of classical music can be a transformative experience to someone from outside of the music world: a medical student looking to become a virtuoso neurosurgeon, or a public school teacher searching for ways to inspire her students in the classroom. Finally, attending a live concert is a rare opportunity to focus, as simple as it sounds, on one activity, forgetting – if for a moment – the fast-paced hours of the day, disconnecting from the digital world and connecting with real people.

Igor Lipinski gives a lecture-recital at Northwestern University

On May 29, 2015, Igor Lipinski presented his doctoral lecture-recital at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois entitled: From Liszt to Victor Borge: A Legacy of Unique Piano Performances. The lecture was part of Lipinski’s doctoral thesis which investigates the performance practice behind some of the most remarkable piano recitals of the past. Since completing his doctoral residency in June of 2014, Lipinski works at Northwestern as an Instructor teaching courses in music appreciation and piano literature. Balancing his performance career with an academic lifestyle, Lipinski passed a series of comprehensive examination and achieved his doctoral candidacy status (all but dissertation) on June 5, 2015.

Igor Lipinski performs at South Dakota State University

On Sunday, October 19, Igor Lipinski gave a guest-artist recital at the Larson Memorial Concert Hall of the South Dakota State University in Brookings, SD. The recital was part of the Brookings Chamber Music Society Series. Lipinski performed in South Dakota several times in the past including his appearances at the 2010 and 2011 Dakota Sky International Piano Festival at the Belbas Theatre of the Washington Pavillion of Arts & Science in Sioux Falls.

Igor Lipinski performs with the Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra at the Oyster Harbors Club

After the sold out concert with the Cape Cod Symphony Orchestra on New Year’s Day in 2013, Igor Lipinski once again joined the ensemble under the direction of the brilliant Jung-Ho Pak to perform his unique presentation of piano, symphony orchestra and interactive magic. The concert, also featuring Broadway actress and singer Sarah Uriarte Berry, took place at the elite Oyster Harbors Club in Osterville, Massachusets on September 12, 2014. Lipinski’s performance was enthusiastically received with two standing ovations. To read more about the Cape Cod Symphony’s innovative programming, please visit capesymphony.org